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Liverpool Scottish Platoon, A (Kings) Company, The Kings and Cheshire Regiment Liverpool Scottish Platoon, A (Kings) Company, The Kings and Cheshire Regiment
 
  The Liverpool Scottish was formed as an infantry battalion in 1900 in response to the crisis of the Boer War. With HQ established in Fraser Street in the Liverpool City Centre, the home of the Scottish until 1967, the Battalion was redesignated in 1908 on the establishment of the Territorial Force as the 10th (Scottish) Battalion, The King's (Liverpool Regiment).

"Dare to be Different"

The following text is courtesy of the Liverpool Scottish Regimental Museum -

In 1859 the United Kingdom was threatened with invasion by Napoleon III of France. This led to the raising of Rifle and Artillery Volunteer Corps for the purposes of meeting such an invasion. Queen Victoria signified her acceptance of a Corps of Volunteers under the title of 'The Liverpool Scottish Rifle Volunteers (XIXth Lancashire)'. There were two companies, a Lowland company and a Highland company, which wore the MacKenzie tartan. These units were, in general, equipped and maintained at their own expense; members paid a subscription and
Liverpool Scottish Platoon, A (Kings) Company, The Kings and Cheshire Regiment
  bought their own uniforms and, in many cases, their commanders maintained them at their own expense. William Brown, a great commercial power in Liverpool, raised and commanded the 1st. Liverpool Artillery Volunteers at the age of 75 and is reputed to have contributed 3000 per annum to their expenses (a figure that is equivalent to over 300,000 today).
 
  Liverpool Scottish Platoon, A (Kings) Company, The Kings and Cheshire Regiment The Liverpool Scottish was formed as an infantry battalion in 1900 in response to the crisis of the Boer War. It was raised from amongst the body of highly educated and professional young Scotsmen in the city as the 8th (Scottish) Volunteer Battalion, The King's (Liverpool Regiment).

There was an annual subscription of 10 shillings (50p) and an entrance fee of 2. The first Commanding Officer was Colonel C. Forbes Bell V.D. The Forbes tartan kilt was adopted by the regiment and the Highland full dress uniform featured a khaki tunic with scarlet collar and facings together with a feather bonnet or glengarry and tartan plaid. A party of 22 men went to South Africa with the 4th Service Company of the Gordon Highlanders and were attached to the 1st. Battalion of that regiment. An account of volunteer service in South Africa with the 1st Service Company of the Gordon Highlanders can be found here. With HQ established in Fraser Street in the Liverpool city centre, the home of the Scottish until 1967, the Battalion was redesignated in 1908 on the establishment of the Territorial Force as the 10th (Scottish) Battalion, The King's (Liverpool Regiment).

In 1914 the Liverpool Scottish was mobilised at the outset of war and moved to France on 1st/2nd November 1914, one of the first Territorial battalions to do so. At this stage of the war, officers still carried swords.... but not for long! The Battalion was made up from the outset of the war by men of high calibre, educated professionals and businessmen.
 
  The first major battalion action of the Liverpool Scottish was on 16th. June 1915 in what is officially known as 'The First Action at Bellewaarde' which was designed to pin down German reserves whilst there were British and French attacks elsewhere.This action is known in The Liverpool Scottish as 'The Battle of Hooge'. Hooge is a village is a few miles East of Ieper (Ypres), straddling the Menin Road.

The Liverpool Scottish, as part of 9th Brigade ( in turn part of the 3rd Division of the Regular Army) , were to take part in the second phase of the attack on ground just North of The Menin Road between (and including) Railway Wood in the North.

They were to be the left hand battalion and to their right was to be a battalion of the Lincolns. The battalion's frontage appears to have been about 400 yards. The assembly position was on the line of 'Cambridge Road', a feature which exists today as a metalled track running North from the Menin Road and a Liverpool Scottish memorial was unveiled and dedicated here on Saturday 29th July 2000 during the centenary year.
Liverpool Scottish Platoon, A (Kings) Company, The Kings and Cheshire Regiment
 
  Liverpool Scottish Platoon, A (Kings) Company, The Kings and Cheshire Regiment In 1920, The Liverpool Scottish reformed as the 10th (Liverpool Scottish) Battalion, The King's Regiment (Liverpool) TA but in 1937 was officially redesignated as The Liverpool Scottish, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders to become an integral Territorial battalion of the Cameron Highlanders. The bonnet badge changed to a Liverpool Scottish version of the Cameron badge. Colours were presented to the battalion by H.M. King George VI at Goodison Park football ground in 1938. A second battalion was formed immediately before the outbreak of war in 1939.

During the 1939-45 war, the 1st Battalion of The Liverpool Scottish remained in Great Britain but found many reinforcements for The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders battalions (and other Highland regiments) on active service overseas.
 
  Additionally the 1st and 2nd. Battalions of the Liverpool Scottish provided a contingent for No. 4 Independent Company which went to Norway in 1940 to face the German invasion. Subsequently, many members served with the Commandos including Captain Donald Roy DSO, decorated for his courage and skill in the raid on St. Nazaire in 1942 in which many other Liverpool Scots took part. Donald Roy, known as 'The Laird', insisted that his men wore kilts both in training and in action. The 2nd. Battalion, The Liverpool Scottish, also supplied reinforcements for Highland regiments and, after serving in a home defence role, converted to the 89th Anti-Tank Regiment, Royal Artillery, disbanding in 1946. The 1st. Battalion served in Gibraltar from 1945 to 1947.

The 1st Battalion The Liverpool Scottish reformed at the Fraser Street Drill Hall in Liverpool in 1947 and, until its disbandment in 1967 when the Territorial Army was reorganised, it was firstly a motor battalion and then an infantry battalion. The battalion won the Territorial Army Shield in the Duke of Edinburgh's Trophy Competition in 1957 and 1960.
Liverpool Scottish Platoon, A (Kings) Company, The Kings and Cheshire Regiment
 
  Liverpool Scottish Platoon, A (Kings) Company, The Kings and Cheshire Regiment

In April 1967, The Liverpool Scottish reformed as V (The Liverpool Scottish) Company, 51st. Highland Volunteers AVR II with battalion HQ in Perth. The company adopted the Highland Brigade bonnet badge (a stag's head upon a saltire) worn on a cloth Forbes tartan background and continued to wear the blue hackle of The Queen's Own Highlanders.

The Forbes tartan kilt (as with all other forms of dress) was retained. On leaving Fraser Street, a new HQ for the Territorial company was established at the TA barracks in Score Lane in Childwall (a Liverpool suburb) which had previously been Signal House. It was renamed Forbes House. The Liverpool Scottish tradition was thus blended for the next twenty five years with that of the famous 51st Highland Division.

In 1974, whilst V Company were attending its annual two weeks training in Cyprus, the government of Archbishop Makarios was overthrown by Greek nationalists. V Company was on exercise in the far west of the island at an isolated location in the Akamas Peninsula. This area was outside the Sovereign Base Areas. After some days of considerable uncertainty, punctuated by forest fires and the arrival of British service families stranded in the area together with resupply bt sea, the company was evacuated through the Greek areas around Paphos to the British Sovereign Base Area at Akrotiri. There they witnessed some of the civil strife which broke out between the two communities in Cyprus when the Turkish Army invaded the north of the island.

 
  In September 1992, V Company marched off the square at Otterburn as the Champion Company and bade farewell to Lt. Colonel David Thorneycroft and the 51st Highland Volunteers. Subsequently in October 1992, the Company was transferred and redesignated as V (The Liverpool Scottish) Company, 5th/8th. (Volunteer) Battalion, The King's Regiment with battalion HQ at Warrington under the command of Lt. Colonel Martin Amlot. The Company gave up the Highland Brigade badge and returned to the bonnet badge of the 10th (Scottish) Battalion of the King's (Liverpool) Regiment, first intoduced in 1908 until replaced by the Liverpool Scottish version of the Cameron badge in 1937.

V Company enjoyed a successful debut in the new battalion, winning the Champion Company banner in their first year. In 1998 the Ashton Trophy was first awarded. This was as a result of a bequest of Harley Watson in memory of his Great War friend, Charles Norman Ashton. In 1999 past and present members of The Liverpool Scottish said farewell to Forbes House, their HQ, as a result of the reorganisation of the Territorial Army and the disbandment of the Liverpool Scottish company.

In July 1999, 50 Liverpool Scottish soldiers, retaining their distinctive bonnet badge, their Highland dress and their regimental customs, were redeployed under Lt Col David Richardson MBE to form part of a new Territorial infantry battalion, The King's and Cheshire Regiment.

This brings us up to today and members of the Liverpool Scottish continue to train across the globe, continuing the memory of past soldiers who fought under the same Banner and Name.
 
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